Social Media

Recently Read: July

|
I read 4.5 books this month (one of these is currently on the back burner while I find the stamina to keep going). But in the month of June, I read some amazing books and some absolutely horrible ones. Keep reading to find out my thoughts on everything! 

what I'm reading, what I read, book review, book recommendations, the Rosie project, sense and sensibility, big little lies, firecracker, magpie murders

what I'm reading, what I read, book review, book recommendations, the Rosie project, sense and sensibility, big little lies, firecracker, magpie murders

what I'm reading, what I read, book review, book recommendations, the Rosie project, sense and sensibility, big little lies, firecracker, magpie murders

what I'm reading, what I read, book review, book recommendations, the Rosie project, sense and sensibility, big little lies, firecracker, magpie murders


The Rosie Project is about a socially awkward genetics professor, Don Tillman, who develops a test to find the perfect wife. His 16 page questionnaire helps eliminate any potential partners who were "unacceptable," such as smokers, drinkers, barmaids and late-arrivers. But as his friendship with Rosie grows, Don needs to re-examine his criteria and figure out if someone who is completely wrong for him on paper may turn out to be his ideal candidate. 

I've heard nothing but great things about this book, but I'm going to admit I was a bit disappointed in it. The character seemed too similar to Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory, and I had a hard time relating to the purposively self-centred and annoying protagonist along with his two friends. I've read much better books about characters with Aspergers or autism. I think if there wasn't so much hype surrounding this book, I would have gone into it with lower expectations and would have enjoyed it more.

Elinor and Marianne Dashwood are sisters with very different personalities. While Elinor is calm and well-mannered, her younger sister is eccentric and passionate. As both girls seek to find suitable husbands, they uncover what they truly want in a perfect partner.

I haven't read many classics, but I really wanted to try a Jane Austen book this summer. I thought I would start with Austen's first novel, Sense and Sensibility. I'm a bit embarrassed to admit it, but I gave up on it. My bookmark is nestled in at 150 pages, taunting me relentlessly that I've left it unfinished. I'm so used to reading thrillers with intrigue and scandal, or contemporary novels with identifiable characters and witty dialogue. While I don't necessarily find the text too outdated to understand, the storyline itself wasn't pulling me in. I'm still hoping to finish this up soon, but I think I need a bit more motivation before I crack it open.

Focusing on three families, Big Little Lies centres around a death that rocks the small community. Madeline, with her vibrant personality, has no problem being the centre of attention and rocking the boat. Celeste's stunning looks and perceived perfect life are the envy of other parents. Jane, the unassuming single mother who recently moved to the area, attempts to find her place in the tight-knit  community. As their paths cross and histories are revealed, the three woman discover the brutally honest truth about each other. 

I absolutely loved this book. It's one of the best books that I've read this year. At first glance, it would appear to be about parents dealing with the struggles of their children as they start school, but the story is much more complex and entertaining. It focuses on domestic abuse and rape, self-worth, post-traumatic stress, bitter divorces and reconciliation. It's about the struggle between putting your child's well-being above your own and learning to let go of the past. I would 100% recommend this book, so much so that I've already purchased two more books by the author.


Firecracker: 0.5/5
This was the book that I tried to read post-Austen. I thought it would be a quick and funny read, especially since the author was a writer on SNL and New Girl. This was probably one of the worst books I've ever read. I'm not even going to summarize it because I don't want anyone thinking it was funny and wanting to try it. Every stereotype was amplified to the umpteenth, the characters were brutally annoying and I hated almost every second of it.


Soon after Susan Ryeland, the editor of Alan Conway's successful Atticus P√ľnd series, receives his last manuscript, she realized it is incomplete. While Ryeland doesn't have the best working relationship with Conway, she soon discovers the links between his novel and his death and inserts herself into the investigation to develop her own clues and theories. As the events begin to unravel, Ryeland must confront those who are closest to her to unveil the truth.

If you're a fan of old school mysteries like Agatha Christie and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, then you'll enjoy this book. It's a unique premise, in that it's a book within a book. The first half is the detective novel, and the second is the publisher trying to piece together the events of a peculiar murder surrounding the book. While I did find the first part a bit slow, I really enjoyed the second half and trying to solve each murder.

Pew! You made it to the end. Congratulations! In the future, would you prefer if I wrote about each book separately, or maybe 2-3 books at a time, so it isn't so lengthy? Let me know!

xoxo K