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Too Faced Peach Perfect Review

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Good Monday morning! I've had a crazy busy week, and even as this blog post goes up, I'm going to be busy AF at work working on a live campaign. Exciting times when you work in social media. Because I've been so busy lately, I thought I would try out the Too Faced Peach Perfect foundation, which claims to be a comfort matte foundation that will keep you oil free for up to 14 hours. Let's see how it worked! 

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Because daylights saving time ended, it's dark by the time I get home so I wasn't able to do before and after photos (well, I mean I could, but they would have looked kinda crappy with the lack of lighting so you'll just have to trust me).  Unfortunately, both of these shades are too dark for me, but I can make porcelain work if I take it down my neck or wear a turtleneck with it (all the cheating).

I love how this foundation feels. I generally only ever wear the Maybelline Fit Me Matte and Poreless, and while I can tell I'm wearing foundation when I have it on, I've become so used to the feeling. With this Too Faced foundation, it felt so lightweight, more like I was wearing a tinted moisturizer.

In terms of longevity, I'd say it faired almost as well as my Maybelline favourite. I needed to blot about six to seven hours after application, which is great for my oily skin. Where I saw the most difference between the two foundations was how it faired post-blot. I found the Too Faced Peach Perfect broke down more after I blotted than the Maybelline one did, which is a bit annoying. It also clung a bit to breakouts around my chin, but most foundations do.

I actually really like the look and feel of this foundation and think I'm going to pick up the lightest shade in the range and see if it works for me (fingers crossed).

Other notable mentions include the Too Faced Peach Blur, which I've been loving! I bake my face with the Too Faced Primed and Poreless pressed powder every morning, then use this powder to wipe the excess off. It adds back a bit of dimension and glow to my otherwise flat face, without making me look greasy. I'm now using this over every base I wear and actually want to get a second for my on-the-go makeup bag. Excessive? Maybe.

And last but not least is the Too Faced Papa Don't Peach blusher. I've been wearing this a lot more than I thought. I've been sick on and off the last few weeks and have been using even paler than usual. This is adding a lot of colour and brightness back into my sallow cheeks. It has some shimmer and a lot of peachy colour and is perfect for a lot of looks.

xoxo K

Stepping outside my (literary) comfort zone

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I have a habit of reading a lot of the same genre of books--mostly thrillers and contemporary novels. But something that I'm really trying to do this year is to step out of my comfort zone. I read a science-fiction thriller a few weeks ago, and I liked it a lot more than I thought I would, but I'm hoping to expand this selection even more. 

the nightingale, the orphans tale, the girl from savoy

Hiddensee, the beginning of the world in the middle of the night, murders in the rue morge, tales of mystery and imagination

The few historical fictions that I've read, I've really enjoyed, especially All the Light We Cannot See and The Cottingley Secret. I've heard that The Nightingale is a spectacular novel, and found it on Book Outlet a few summers ago. I also found The Orphan's Tale for $2 in my used bookstore and thought it sounded beautiful, albeit it devastating. And I'm excited to read more Hazel Gaynor (author of The Cottingley Secret), and found The Girl from Savoy in my favourite used bookstore as well.

I also want to venture into the world of darker, mysterious, fairy-tale esque novels. I know this is more of a broad topic, but I figured it's a better way to ease myself in. I love the few Poe stories I've read in school, and when I saw that Tales of Mystery and Imagination contained The Murders in the Rue Morge, I knew I had to have it. I've heard wonderful things about Jen Campbell's dark and twisted short stories in The Beginning of the World in the Middle of the Night and ordered it from Book Depository since it wasn't available in Canada. And bringing up the rear is Hiddensee by the author of Wicked.

I have so many books on my TBR list (literally my entire bookcase upstairs is unread books), so I don't want to promise I'll get to them and review them anytime soon, but I'm hoping to try at least a couple before the end of the year.

Do you read a lot of the same genre, or do you read a more diverse selection?

xoxo K

Too Faced Just Peachy review

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It's funny how you change as you grow up. Once upon a time, I would have gone crazy for the Too Faced Just Peachy palette. Some combination would have been on my eyes every day, and I would have talked about this about 10 times over already. But recently, I've been wearing maybe one to two colours max on my eyes at a time. It may be because I'm getting up at 5:30 for work and doing a more colourful, intense look doesn't seem appropriate for an 8 a.m. start time, or because I'm just lazy. That's not to say I don't love this palette, it's just that I've used it less than I thought I would. Keep reading to hear my entire thoughts and see swatches! 

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I absolutely loved the Sweet Peach palette Too Faced brought out last year because of the quality of the shadows and colour selection. So needless to say I was biting at the bit to get my hands on this beauty. All the colours in the Just Peachy palette are matte, and keep with the warm-toned, peachy nature of Too Faced's iconic range.

Pigmentation 
As you can see in the swatches above, the colours are vibrant and gorgeous. Each one above was only one swatch of my finger. But because I'm so pale, the colours are almost too pigmented for me. I really need to blend the edges out when I use this palette because they show up so much on my snow white level pale skin. But I can imagine this palette would be a dream on darker skin tones.

Colours
The colours come off true to pan and are very warm toned. I would say I would have liked a bit more variety in the palette, like the Sweet Peach which had greens, peaches and purples. I found the colours in this palette a bit more repetitive, but still beautiful. You can great a really natural look with the top row, or add some fun and vibrancy with the Just Ripe and Peach Sangria.

Quality
I'm not at all surprised that the quality of the shadows are gorgeous. With the exception of the Chocolate Chip palette, Too Faced is consistently good. They are buttery and very easy to blend, with little fallout. I would probably recommend putting on your eye makeup before foundation, but that's something I usually do anyway, just in case.

Overall, I really like this palette. Because it's matte, it's a great staple to have. You can use it as-is or add some shimmer or glitter to create an even more complex look. I think if you're a fan of warm-toned shades, then you need this palette in your life!

xoxo K

Recently Read: October

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Hello everyone! As much as I love fall, it doesn't like me. I suffer from a lot of sinus headaches this time of the year, and I find that when Advil doesn't work, the only thing I can do is turn off all the lights, put an eye mask on and earplugs in, and sleep it off. Unfortunately, that means not as much blogging or reading time. I was still able to get through five books this month. Keep reading to hear my thoughts! 

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The Heart's Invisible Furies 5/5
This was the first book I read in October and it took me a long time to get back into a book after it. It was probably over a week before I even picked up another book because it was so amazing. I have a full review here.

Dark Matter 4/5
Emily Fox has raved about this book and I figured October would be the perfect time to read it. "Are you happy with your life?" These are the last words Jason Dessen hears before a masked abductor knocks him unconscious. He wakes to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by people who apparently know him, asking questions about his experiences over the last year and a half. But Jason is at a loss about what these scientists want and who they are. As he finds out his entire world is different from the one he knows, he must face the fact that something remarkably different and seemingly impossible has happened, and he must find the courage to find his way back to the life he knows.

I don't read much science fiction, so I found myself struggling with this book. It requires the reader to suspend belief in reality and how we view the world. It takes place across multiple universes. The theory is that every choice we make or don't make defines the reality we exist in, and the ones where the choices were different from the ones we choose still exist in alternate realities. To enter the alternative universes, an individual must take a drug that affects (something rather) in your brain and enter an object in superposition.  It relies on the idea of Schrödinger's cat, where once we are able to let go of our observable world are we able to see both what is there and what isn't.

I probably did a horrible job explaining that because to be honest, I still don't know if I understand it. But the thriller element of the book really kept me engaged. As I read a lot of thrillers, I find they can get quite repetitive, but the science fiction element provided a unique twist, especially as the book progressed. I don't want to say too much at the risk of giving it away, but if you're like me, I think this book is a great way to step outside of your comfort zone.

The Child Finder 4/5
I was so excited to read this because it was the first ever ARC I recieved (despite the fact it's already on sale, I was over the moon). I watch a lot of booktubers and was always so in awe of unique covers and hearing about books months before their relese date.

Three years earlier, Madison Culver went missing in Oregon's Skookum National Forest on a trip with her parents to find the perfect Christmas tree. Naomi, a private investigator that specializes in missing child cases, is called to the scene to investigate Madison's disappearance. As Naomi struggles with dead ends, she is forced to examine the horrors of her own childhood. Focusing on how our imagination can help us through life's darkest times, The Child Finer is a poetic and memorable book.

This book was very poetic, and it took me a while to adjust to the writing style, especially after I had just finished something as scientific as Dark Matter. It was challenging, if not almost disturbing, to read from Madison's perspective of her captor. Because she was only five years old when she was kidnapped, her view on Mr. B and the life she was becoming accustomed to was difficult to read. While she did struggle at the beginning, the adoration she felt for Mr. B, despite the physical and psychological abuse she faced, was incomprehensible. It's difficult to imagine being entirely dependant on someone for three years and being locked in a cellar during that time. Madison alluded to sexual assault on a few occasions, and the thought of a grown man abusing a child in that manner was sickening.

But reading Naomi's parts were almost uplifting. As a survivor of abduction as a child, Naomi had a unique perspective on what missing children were facing and how their imagination could help them through it. She was relentless in trying to save Madison, among other children, because of the personal horrors she experienced. Like Dark Matter, this thriller was very different from what I had read, and I found myself thinking about it long after I'd put the book down. While I studied Criminology in university, something I always wanted to learn more about was victimology, and despite the fact this was a work of fiction, I felt like this was a fresh and unique insight into the ideology. While it can be triggering, I think this book is definitely worth the read and brings a fresh voice to the world of psychological thrillers.

We Were Liars 2/5
This book is so hyped. Whether it's BookTube, Bookstagram or Goodreads, I'm pretty sure everyone has read it at one point. I found it for $2 at my local used bookstore and thought it would be a great chance to read it. I'm not a huge YA fan so I didn't have high hopes going into this book.

Following the beautiful and rich Sinclair family, the story focuses on the four "liars" and summer "15" on their private island. Focusing on damaged relationships, class differentiation, destructive ideologies and grief, We Were Liars examines the lengths a family will go to to protect those they love.

This was my commuting book, so I was reading it at the same time as The Child Finder and found a lot of similarities between the two. Both were very poetic in terms of the writing styles, both dealt with grief and the coping mechanisms our brains develop in times of trauma. But unlike The Child Finder, I found We Were Liars to be very juvenile. It focused on a very privileged family who complained about their very privileged upbringing, predominately their future inheritance. I found the main characters intolerable. They acted like the silver platter that life was handed to them on was too tarnished, and came across as spoiled brats on every page. Despite the fact the story was only 250 pages, it felt too long and repetitive. The only redeeming feature of the novel was the twist at the end. Becuase I was only reading about 20 pages every few days (when the subway wasn't too loud or crowded and I could actually read), I didn't see the twist coming. But if I had sat down and read the book in one to two sittings (which would have been easily achievable), I almost certainly would have seen it coming. I really don't know why this book is so hyped, but it's already in the donation pile and I would definitely not recommend it.

The River at Night 3/5
I hadn't actually heard a lot about this book, but it sounded vaguely like the movie Deliverance, so I thought it would be the perfect book to read around Halloween.

A group of four best friends decide to embark on a thrilling vacation in the remote parts of the Michigan forests on a hiking and white water rafting trip. But soon after their trip begins, they find themselves in trouble. A freak accident leaves the women stranded, separating them from their raft and means of survival. But when they find a ramshackle camp, they find themselves in an even more threatening situation. Fighting against themselves and the elements, the four women must do anything it takes to survive this nightmare.

I really liked the storyline of this book, but I think it was the writing style that prevented me from giving it a higher rating. It was very abrupt and choppy, and there was something I couldn't quite put my finger on, but I found I wasn't able to visualize what I was reading like I usually can. I found it also played up the idea of disability too conveniently as well. Wini just happened to be the only one in her group who would communicate with Dean, who was deaf like her brother was. Wini felt compelled to try and save Dean because she had lost her brother years before despite the fact she had just met him, even if this meant turning against her lifelong friendships.  I feel like the book had a lot of potential, but it wasn't executed well.

Overall, I read a mixture of books this month. I found a new favourite and read some books that I can't get off my shelves quick enough. What have you been reading lately? Are you going to continue with thrillers into November?

xoxo K

Too Faced Peaches and Cream: Peach my Cheeks

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I'm a huge fan of blush! Because I'm so fair, I find that I can look quite washed out without any colour in my cheeks. Over the summer, I really got into using cream blushes, so I was excited to hear that Too Faced was bringing out a cream blush that dries down to a powder. I was very kindly sent the Peaches and Cream collection, including the Peach my Cheeks blush, to try out have been playing around with the blushes for the last few weeks. Keep reading to find my thoughts on the range! 

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Pigmentation:
I think the colours are beautiful and would work for a variety of skin tones. There are lots of pinks and nudes, and while you can build them up for a more opaque colour, they start off quite sheer. Peach Berry would be a gorgeous colour on deeper skin tones, but I quite like wearing it very lightly as well.

Longevity:
With the exception of the palest shade (peach dream), I found they all lasted well throughout the day (which for me is over 10 hours).  I didn't have any problems with them fading or shifting the rest of my makeup like other cream blushes can. In fact, I swatched these blushes on my arm about six hours ago, tried to remove it with an oil-based makeup remover and soap in the shower, and I can still see the deepest three colours. Now that's long-lasting!

Consistency:
The blushes definitely have a creamy consistency when swatching and applying, but unlike most cream blushes I've tried, they do dry down to a velvet finish and stay put. The darkest colour (Peach Berry) is a tiny bit patchier than the others, but it could also just be because it's so dark I notice it more. In general, I find them quite consistent and apply beautifully.

Overall, I think these blushes are beautiful. The colours perfectly complement the rest of the Peaches and Cream collection but are also natural enough to pair with almost any other look. My preference is pinch my peach--its the perfect natural shades and goes with any eye or lip look and really works to sculpt the cheeks. It would be my recommendation if you just wanted to start with one blush, but I would definitely recommend trying out a few of them!

xoxo K

Home Decor Inspiration: Bedroom Makeover

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Hi everyone! It's been a while since I did any sort of home decor post, and I'm itching to re-do my bedroom. I've had the same dresser for 22 years now (and surprisingly, it's still intact), but it's definitely too small for my needs and quite dated looking. I've been all over Pinterest in the last few months, attempting to come up with a mood board of sorts so when I'm (financially) ready to update my space, I'll know exactly when I'm looking for. I've love to hear your suggestions for storage solutions for small spaces!

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The idea: I have a super small bedroom (and I know there are people who have much smaller spaces than I do, but seeing as I live at home, my bedroom needs to function as a bedroom, living room and office, all in one. So 10' X 11' isn't the greatest space to work with). While I'd love to find a vintage armoire and use that to store my clothes, unfortunately, everything I find is either too short or (way) too expensive. My main concern right now is finding storage solutions for my sweaters and pants. My closet is less than 4 ft wide, so traditional closet organizers won't fit and I don't want to pay for custom. Aside from bins under my bed, I don't really have any place to store my sweaters, and living in Canada, I have quite a few of them!

What I'm thinking of is getting the Ikea Hemnes cabinet, so that all my sweaters are visible on the top (colour coordinated, obviously), and I'd have room underneath for pyjamas, undies and t-shirts. I could either do two of these, side by side for lots of storage or add the thinner cabinets or bookcases on either side (pictured below) to store my ever-growing pile of books.

bedroom, redo, redecorating, small spaces, storage, storage for small spaces

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Conversely, because I keep on TV and jewellery on my current dresser, I was thinking of adding something like the Hemnes dresser beside the standing cabinet to have the surface area (but annoying, they are different depths). 

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I'd love to hear your storage solutions for small spaces and sweater storage!

xoxo K

The Heart's Invisible Furies: Book Review

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580 pages didn't seem nearly long enough to explore the depth of the blatant bigotry and homophobia of Ireland. I closed the book last night, tears streaming down my face wondering about so many of the characters. What will happen to them? Did he really change? If people can change, why hasn't society? The Heart's Invisible Furies by John Boyne allowed me to explore the dark past of a country that I have always fantasized and examine my own experiences in turn.


I heard Liberty from All The Books podcast rave about this book about a month ago, so when I found it for $15 in my local used bookstore, I knew I had to grab it. She sounded so passionate about her review, and I'm drawn to anything that takes place in Ireland. If I go back far enough down the ancestorial tree, you could say I was Irish (or a very far removed descendant). 

The Heart's Invisible Furies is an eclectic tale of Cyril Avery, who was born out of wedlock to a teenaged girl from the Irish countryside in the 1940's and was adopted into an unconventional family who made it quite clear that he was not a real Avery. Told over the course of 70 years, it depicts the struggles and prejudices Cyril faced as he tried to hide his homosexuality in a time where it was not only considered morally repulsive, but also a crime to be gay. As it weaves together the various players in his life and how their involvement shaped him, the story is one about identity, self-worth and change. 

This book. This book had me laughing out loud at times, and grabbing for the nearest tissue at others. While I knew that the Catholic Church played a very prominent role in Ireland, I don't think I had really considered the extent to which it controlled society until reading this book. 


The Role of Women 

Not only did the church dictate how homosexuals were treated, but also the role of women in society. Women were forced to stay home and work, and it was noted that legally, women were forced into retirement upon marriage. Can we talk about this for a minute? Retirement. Marriage. The fact that it was legally punishable to continue working after becoming wed, which was often quite young, would completely dictate a woman's self-worth. She would be entirely reliant on her spouse to support her, both financially and emotionally as she would be cut off from the experience and comradery that a workplace has to offer. The law was so against women that it was mentioned a husband was let off after murdering his wife because the jury believed she was unfaithful and that warranted his outrageous behaviour. 

     "He doesn't like women who read either. He told me that reading gives women ideas."

There were two very strongwilled characters in this book who I adored: Maude Avery and Catherine Goggin. Both were feminists before their time and refused to stand idly by while they allowed a man to support them, either emotionally or financially. In the cause of Maude, who was a novelist, the characters in her books were depicted as feisty, independent women. When questioned why she only wrote female protagonists, she responded that it was because men wouldn't and someone needed to. Despite her marriage to Charles, Maude continued to bury herself in her novels, and while she actively hated the idea of fame, she believed her messages were important and needed to be told. 

Similarly, after being publically shamed and expelled from the Church, Catherine did what she needed to survive--she lied, saying she was an expectant widow to secure a job to provide for herself. Had it not been for the kindness of the manageress at the tea room, Catherine would have needed to either find someone to marry or start a new life for herself once the child was born. The reoccurrence of the character throughout the book strengthened her position as a strong, independent women, in the way she treated the TD's and politicians and in her personal life. 

The Repugnant Homosexuals 

The main theme of this novel is the hatred of homosexuals in Ireland. They were referred to as "dirty queers", and their actions "disgusting" and "immoral". Men were terrified of being found out, in fear of losing their jobs, families and even their lives. But they also lived in fear of themselves--of who they had to become, however deceitful and mendacious their actions were, and hurting those they were closest too. 

           "But the more I examined the architecture of my life," Cyril said, "the more I realize how     
            fraudulent were its foundations. The belief that I would spend the rest of my time on earth
            lying to people weighed heavily on me and at such times I gave serious consideration to 
            taking my own life." 

Homosexuality was also considered an illness, one that could be cured with some potentially unethical practices. In one scene, it was explained how a doctor would yell out names of popular male figures while the patient listened with his pants down, and upon arousal, the doctor would stab his penis with a syringe to condition the patient to feel pain when he thought of men. They were also considered mentally disordered and deprived of rights (in many cases, the right to live as juries of religious, white men would decide that it was in their best interest that someone had murdered them as it put them out of their misery). 

The (lack of) Evolution of Society 

While the book explores the aforementioned problems over the course of 70 years, it was sad to see how little actually changed in not only Ireland but around the world. During Cyril's time in Amsterdam, there was wide acceptance of gays in the community, and they could walk down the streets, hand in hand, without so much as a comment or disgruntled stare. But the rent boys brought light to the fact many were still being exploited at a young age and were too ashamed to seek help. 

As you begin to think that things are finally looking up for Cyril, he inserts himself in the AIDS epidemic in the late 80's, finding himself living in New York City at the time. People still believed that only gay's could contract the disease, and spewed hatred towards the group wherever they were--having dinners with friends, in the press, and in central park, the scene of a particularly tragic but probably all too real scene in the novel. Gays were considered to be inferior and grotesque, spreading life-threatening diseases from their immoral ways. 

Another common problem in the book was the idea of victim-blaming. Years after Cyril left Ireland, when he attempted to explain his actions to friends and family after his abrupt departure, there were comments along the vain of "why weren't you just honest with me?" People seemed to think that because they lived in a more "enlightened" time now, that his actions during a different time were unwarranted. Yet throughout the book, there is mention of gays being murdered, stripped of all dignity and status for being "out". It wasn't an easy life, hiding your true identity in fear of persecution when gays were handed prison sentences for holding their partner's hand in public! That being said, Cyril did have very difficult choices to make, and the pressure and stress he felt may not have allowed him to make a level-headed decision on such matters. The book really questions whether there is ever the right time to confide in someone, or whether you need an implicit level of trust in those you care about. 

Concluding Thoughts 

The book explored so much and questioned what we as a society want for our people; how we can learn from history to ensure it doesn't repeat itself; how bigoted, old-fashioned beliefs can stifle progress; and so many more concepts that do not just apply to homosexuality, but to women's rights and to the oppression of minority groups. It addresses people's resilience in the face of adversity and the undying strength of humanity. I would 100 per cent recommend this book, and I cannot wait to pick up some others by John Boyne. 

I will leave you with this quote: 

            "I have known bigotry, I've known shame and I've known love. And somehow, I always 
             survive."

xoxo K

Stepping outside of my comfort zone: Fashion edition

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My third outfit picture in a row, and this is by far the most out of my comfort zone. Even walking along Queens Quay I was holding onto the front of this Tobi skirt for dear life hoping I wouldn't flash everyone walking by. But it's a beautiful and flattering skirt, and it was so comfortable to wear. You could easily wear this with a silk cami for a night out, or mock neck for colder days. I choose to wear it with this adorable graphic tee I found for under $10 at Zara and some heeled booties for an "edgier" look, something my lovely photographer brattyb laughed at me for. This is edgy for me, guys! 
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Top: Zara (under $10!) // Skirt: Tobi (sent for review) // Botties: Similar // Watch: Daniel Wellington // Sunnies: Quay

xoxo K

Recently Read: September

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It's time for another reading wrap-up! I read two amazing books this month and a few meh ones, to one I just really didn't like. I'm excited to share my thoughts with you! I'm just going to review the book this month instead of summarizing each book, but I will link them if you want to read more about them.

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In a Dark, Dark Wood: 4/5

This was the second Ruth Ware book I read, and although I didn't enjoy The Lying Game, I really liked this one. The story was told predominately from the past but would jump forward to her time in the hospital just after the tragedy. It was a closed circuit mystery so there were only a finite number of culprits, which in my opinion, made it more interesting to figure out who it was. I find sometimes when there are too many players involved, the ending is so out of the blue that it ruins the story. The book was fast paced through the middle, but after her brain injury and her inability to recall what happened, it really slowed down. But because of this turn of events, it was interesting to uncover the events along with the main character.

The story focused on the idea of how we second guess ourselves and how the brain can convince us that falsities are true, especially as a coping mechanism in times of trauma. It also focuses on how these ideas of truth and understanding are constantly in flex. Overall, it was a very engaging story but wasn't entirely unpredictable.

Copy Cat: 3/5
I really wasn't a fan of this book. While it had an interesting concept of being stalked and having your life replicated on social media, I found it dragged on far too long and was entirely unrealistic in parts (especially the last third of the book). It questions the idea of sanity in oneself and our ability to trust others in the face of seemingly indisputable evidence. It touches on our sense of security in the age of social media, in light of how much we share, who has access to it and the ease of accessibility of other peoples information. It also brought the ideas of mental illness, including anxiety, suicide, bipolar disorder into the story in a somewhat cliched way. I found the story was too drawn out and bizarre, and wouldn't recommend it.

Today Will be Different: 2/5
I enjoyed (most of) Where'd you go, Bernadette so when I found this book at my used bookstore, I was excited to try it. I found the writing style to be very odd, though, and the characters to be incredibly unlikable. The story was quite jumpy, between the past and present, and because of the main character's bizarre and eccentric thought process, it made the story hard to follow. The character is a lot of ways was similar to Bernadette, and I've heard that all of Maria Temple's stories are very similar. There wasn't anything that I liked about this book--I wasn't compelled to keep reading, I hated the abrupt storyline and the way things came out of the blue and wouldn't recommend this book at all.

How to Stop Time: 4.5/5
I read an article about uplifting literature, and it had this book listed beside Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, so naturally, I needed to order it. It was an interesting concept, with the main character being hundreds of years old, and it really explored the life lessons that he experienced. It dealt with ideas about choosing your own life, finding love and dealing with loss; in our ability to trust other people, find yourself and discover what you are passionate about. It talked about the enduring love between a mother and her child and between partners and centred around the idea of finding something in life that is worth living and fighting for.

The prose was beautiful in the book, and I found myself reading it well into the night (despite my 5:30 am wake up). That's not to say there weren't problems though. As with many time travel or historical fiction books, the main character seemed to befriend some of the most famous people in history, including Shakespeare and F. Scott Fitzgerald. But I didn't find that the new cliches deterred from the overall story. I think this is a beautifully written book, and I would highly recommend it if you are interested in a unique spin on a contemporary tale.

The Cottingley Secret: 5/5
One of my favourite movies growing up was Fairy Tale: A True Story, which was as the name suggests, is a true story. This book was published for the 100th year anniversary of the first fairy photograph being taken, and while it's not the same as the movie, it is based on the same real-life events and has a very similar theme. It switches perspectives between Frances's memoir of the events between 1917 and 1921, and present-day Ireland, where Olivia finds the story and puts the pieces together regarding her family connection to it.

I absolutely adored this book! There were beautiful prose, humorous elements, and tragedy that played off each other wonderfully. While the primary focus was on the photographic evidence of fairies, the lessons we learned extended far beyond that. It questioned what it means to believe in something, and how belief differs for everyone. It addresses how the idea or belief in something can be more powerful than the truth. And while we may not be able to control the situations we are placed in, we can control our response and write our own stories. It isn't a fantasy book, so don't let the concept of fairies fool you, but if you love contemporary and historical fiction, then this book is a must-read.

The Radleys: 3/5
I honestly don't think I've read a book about vampires since I read Twilight in grade 9, but as this book was the same author as How To Stop Time, I thought I would give it a try. I actually thought this was a YA book, but there were a few awkwardly described sex scenes that lead me to believe it wasn't. It was a silly book about a family of abstaining vampires who got tied up in the murder of a local boy. There were some funny parts, but it was mostly something to keep me distracted on my commute to work. I think if you want a super easy distraction type read, then this book will satisfy that, but there's nothing special about it.

What are you reading in the month of October? I've just started The Heart's Invisible Furies and am loving it so far!

xoxo K

Fall Fashion: Cord Skirts

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Look, guys! More clothes. For this post, I'm wearing an adorable button up corduroy skirt from Tobi. I've loved this style of skirt for years, and while I have a burgundy and purple, I didn't actually own a black one.  I paired it with a striped turtleneck and (mostly) opaque tights, but I would love it with bare legs, running shoes and a graphic sweatshirt as well! It's such an easy piece to wear, versatile piece! 

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Top: similar // Skirt: Tobi (sent for review) (also loving this one)  // Boots: similar here and here // Bag: similar // Sunnies: Quay

Who else is super excited for sweater and tights weather? *raises both hands* 

xoxo K

Living in: Sweater Dresses

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I love sweater dresses. They're so comfy and easy to throw on, especially during this transitional period. While I'm working in a corporate environment now, and have been slowing changing my style from poor student to slightly less poor co-op, I still love pieces like this Tobi dress for weekends (and casual Fridays!) Over the next week, I'll be sharing three different outfit photos that area great ideas for fall! Hope you enjoy! 

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tobi, outfit, fall fashion, outfits, fall clothing, sweaters, sweater dresses, blanket scarf, blanket scarves, riding boots, fall styling, toronto blogger

tobi, outfit, fall fashion, outfits, fall clothing, sweaters, sweater dresses, blanket scarf, blanket scarves, riding boots, fall styling, toronto blogger

tobi, outfit, fall fashion, outfits, fall clothing, sweaters, sweater dresses, blanket scarf, blanket scarves, riding boots, fall styling, toronto blogger

tobi, outfit, fall fashion, outfits, fall clothing, sweaters, sweater dresses, blanket scarf, blanket scarves, riding boots, fall styling, toronto blogger

Dress: Tobi (sent for review) (also loving this and this) // Scarf: old, Zara (but loving this and this) // Boots: old, J.Crew (similar) // Sunnies: Quay 

It's been a year since I last did an outfit post! I did a post over a year ago where I talked about my struggle with weight gain, and I haven't felt comfortable sharing outfit photos since then. I was finally coming to terms with my weight more recently, but between yesterday and today, actually seeing photos of myself again, I had a bit of a setback. I'm not the happiest with my appearance, but I don't want that to keep me from feeling comfortable in clothes and I'm tired of feeling so self conscious about my appearance. I hope you enjoy the photos and are enjoying the lovely weather we've been having! 

xoxo K